#ConstantlyCraving by @MarilynMeberg

Official Book Description:

We want more. More peace. More excitement. More romance. More free time. More chocolate …

Our cravings are written into our DNA. They’re influenced by our childhood experiences. They’re driving the choices we make as adults. And often, they’re keeping us hungry. Never satisfied. Ever searching.

What do they mean? What are we to do with them? Should we feel guilty? Are there solutions?

Counselor and author Marilyn Meberg knows all about cravings. She also knows the One who knit us together, desires and all. With wit and compassion, Marilyn helps us understand our appetites, offers advice for managing them here on earth, and encourages us to eagerly await the day when we will find total satisfaction in heaven.

In the meantime, Constantly Craving is an excellent reminder that our desires for more can lead us to the One we really need, the only One who will quench our thirst forever. Really? Really!

My thoughts:

Where a collection of reviewers harped on the fact that this book does not focus enough on what the cover leads one to think it to be about (physical food), I think that Mrs. Meberg addresses a serious, serious topic — holistic discipline.

It’s no secret that our society loves the discipline of food. Eat well, fast well. But I just had a lengthy conversation with a friend about how much disciplines overlap one another. Food and relationships and even study of the Word they are all linked together. And when you progress in one area, you naturally progress in another … furthermore, when you progress in one area, OTHERS naturally progress in their  own journeys.

Anyways, enough of my own thoughts and more about the book and the authors. The author is a counselor by trade, and the book displays that. She breaks off into physiological discourse from time to time (and she includes very little theological or exegetical research). It reads more like a journal of thoughts, comprised of someone who has wrestled with Scripture and a wide variety of people who struggle with a lack ofdiscipline (not just food, but consumerism and marriage and work and so on).

Why are we always craving? Why are we always wanting MORE than we have right now? Why are we standing at the well, drawing small buckets — when we have water, everlasting, standing before us? That is the message that Meberg is after and it is a serious question that needs addressed in our busy, unsatisfied culture. The book would probably best be fleshed out within a group of people, as it is only surface deep most of the time.

Pick up your copy here.

*This book was free with my promise to post an unbiased review.